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  • Writer's pictureClaire Venus

SECOND YEAR OF EMERGING ARTIST AWARD ANNOUNCED FOR NORTH EAST

· 2022/23 North East Emerging Artist Award entries open.

· Open to artists in the NE region or from the region.

· Eight artists will be shortlisted with two chosen to realise their site specific proposals.

· The final two works will be developed to be showcased at Seaton Delaval Hall in spring 2024.

Photo credits - Colin Davidson


Following the success of its inaugural year, applications are now open for the 2022-23 North East Emerging Artist Award. A collaboration between the National Trust at Seaton Delaval Hall and Curator, Matthew Jarratt, it is open to artists in or from the North East who are in the final year of their undergraduate degree, studying for a masters’ degree or who have graduated in the last three years.

The award, developed by Curator, Matthew Jarratt and Seaton Delaval Hall’s General Manager, Emma Thomas, is open to artists from all artforms and applications are encouraged from music/sound, theatre, film, literature and design as well as fine art.

From the applications, eight artists will be supported with a £350 bursary to develop their proposals, which will be presented at Seaton Delaval Hall from May 2023. Two of those shortlisted proposals will then be awarded to be realised and exhibited in the spring of 2024 with a budget of £4,000.

The award’s aim is to showcase site specific contemporary art in a historic context and to encourage emerging artists to develop proposals at Seaton Delaval Hall, one of the region’s most distinct historic settings.

Award Curator, Matthew Jarratt, said:

‘I’m delighted to once again be working on the North East Emerging Artist’s Award with Seaton Delaval Hall. Last year we received nearly sixty proposals, which was extraordinary for its first year so we’re excited to see what proposals will come forward this year.’

The three winning proposals for the 2021-22 prize are from audio producer, Chantal Herbert and cultural curator and photographer, Dami Fawehinmi; designer-maker and architect, Edmond Salter and dancer, Maria Isidora. Their three winning pieces will be displayed at the same time as the shortlisted proposals for this year’s submission in the spring of 2023.

Seaton Delaval Hall’s General Manager Emma Thomas said


‘This is an opportunity for artists interested in producing site-specific work to develop their practise. The Delaval family have an outstanding and rich history of supporting new art, theatre and architecture since the 18th Century and it is exciting to see how a new generation of artists will be inspired by Seaton Delaval Hall.’


Before taking up her post at Seaton Delaval Hall, Emma was a founding member of the team at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, part of the management team ahead of its opening in 2002 and head of the learning and engagement programmes for 20 years. She previously worked at Modern Art Oxford, and the Liverpool Biennial before joining BALTIC and was on the Board of engage, the National Association of Gallery Education.

Artists will be able to engage with a variety of settings at the property, from its interiors and outbuildings to the revived and dramatic Vanbrugh landscape to realise their ideas. They will be mentored and advised by Matthew Jarratt throughout the process and a designated National Trust lead will support each successful artist. The eight shortlisted proposals will then go on display at Seaton Delaval Hall in spring 2023, when visitors will be able to take part in the process of selecting the final two.

Anyone interested in participating in the award can visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/seaton-delaval-hall to download the application form. Applications close Friday 9th December.

About the National Trust

The National Trust is a conservation charity founded in 1895 by three people: Octavia Hill, Sir Robert Hunter and Hardwicke Rawnsley, who saw the importance of the nation's heritage and open spaces and wanted to preserve them for everyone to enjoy. Today, across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, we continue to look after places so people and nature can thrive.


The challenges of the coronavirus pandemic have shown this is more important than ever. From finding fresh air and open skies to tracking a bee's flight to a flower; from finding beauty in an exquisite painting or discovering the hidden history of a country house nearby - the places we care for enrich people's lives. Entirely independent of Government, the National Trust looks after more than 250,000 hectares of countryside, 780 miles of coastline and 500 historic properties, gardens and nature reserves.

The National Trust is for everyone - we were founded for the benefit of the whole nation. We receive on average more than 26.9 million visits each year to the places we care for that have an entry fee, and an estimated 100m visits to the outdoor places that are free of charge. Paying visitors, together with our 5.6 million members and more than 53,000 volunteers, support our work to care for nature, beauty, history. For everyone, for ever.


About Seaton Delaval Hall

Seaton Delaval Hall was commissioned by Admiral George Delaval and designed by Sir John Vanbrugh, the architect behind Castle Howard and Blenheim Palace. Partially destroyed by fire in 1822, it is considered to be one of the finest examples of baroque architecture, having had little subsequent intervention.


The hall was home to the larger than life Delaval family, known as the ‘Gay Delavals’ due to their high spirited and flamboyant lifestyle. In an age notorious for extremes of behaviour, they stood apart as the most notorious of all Georgian partygoers and pranksters. The Delavals loved a performance, staging events from rope dancers and sack races outdoors to masquerade balls and even their own theatrical productions, which earned rave reviews at the time.


Following the death of the 22nd Lord and Lady Hastings, the National Trust acquired Seaton Delaval Hall in 2009, achieved in part as a result of extensive fundraising support from the local community. Since then, the Trust has undertaken much needed conservation work at the hall including rewiring the West Wing; connecting to mains drainage and sewerage, relaying the Central Hall floor and stabilising its statues and reroofing the East Wing.


Thanks to the generous donation from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, 2018-2022 heralded the Curtain Rises project, where as well as improvements to visitor facilities and extensive conservation work, the stories of Seaton Delaval Hall’s colourful past are now brought to life.

About Matthew Jarratt

Matthew is based in North East England, and has worked across the UK, Europe and China on arts commissioning, curatorial projects and cultural policy.

Matthew worked as an artist from the mid 1980s to mid 1990s and then spent 15 years at Arts Council England as a creative broker, helping to shape the North East’s culture led regeneration, working on many new arts buildings, artist’s commissions and opportunities for new artists across the region. Between 2008/10 Matthew represented the cultural sector at the North East England Office in Brussels.


Since 2013 he has managed the North East Culture Partnership, curated visual arts projects across China, established and curated Cheeseburn Sculpture Gardens in Northumberland (2014-2021) and worked with private sector clients to commission over 30 public artworks within new capital developments in England and Scotland. In autumn 2019 Matthew was appointed as an Associate Professor with Newcastle University to develop closer links through arts and culture between Newcastle and East Asia and exhibitions addressing Climate Change.

Matthew has a longstanding commitment to encourage opportunities for early career artists. Through his work at Cheeseburn he mentored over 50 young fine art graduates and is currently managing new commissions for 11 young photographers, sculptors and poets within new private sector capital developments across the UK, Matthew’s work in China has twice included judging the Art Nova 100 prize which supports 100 young Chinese artists each year in Beijing and was the international judge for the Earth Art competition for young environmental architects and designers in Changchun.


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